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. a top taliban commander is killed in northwest pakistan. his violent movies are box office gold. we hear from quentin tar antino about his new film abnd nd signature style. welcome to our viewers on public television and around the globe. the five men accused of raping a university student for hours on a bus were charged and if convicted they may face the death penalty. the 23 year old woman died last week. it has sparked a debate in india. >> protests go on on the rape that has shocked india. lawyers set up to handle the case get their first trial. none are prepared to defend the five men charged with murdering and raping the student. >> it is heinous and in respect to the girl victim and as a message that we want to send to society, we want our society to be safe and such criminals will not get representation. >> no one is at home at the shack where the bus driver was living. the juvenile suspect al ledgedly caused the worst violence. the neighborhood under a cloud of shame. they say attitudes to women need to change. >> the problem sis with men, says this woman. and their bad intentio
in northwest pakistan. his violent movies are box gold. we hear from quentin tar antino about his new film abnd nd signature style. welcome to our viewers on public television and around the globe. the five men accused of raping a university student for hours on a bus were charged and if convicted they may face the death penalty. the 23 year old woman died last week. it has sparked a debate in india. >> protests go on on the rape that has shocked india. lawyers set up to handle the case get their first trial. none are prepared to defend the five men charged with murdering and raping the student. >> it is heinous and in respect to the girl victim and as a message that we want to send to society, we want our society to be safe and such criminals will not get representation. >> no one is at home at the shack where the bus driver was living. the juvenile suspect al ledgedly caused the worst violence. the neighborhood under a cloud of shame. they say attitudes to women need to change. >> the problem sis with men, says this woman. and their bad intentions. after boarding the bus, the medical student
soldiers, which the military blamed on pakistan. he added that this should not derail stronger cross border ties. >> this is completely unacceptable. but at the same time, it's very important we make sure that whatever has happened may not -- should not be escalated. >> the indian military says a deadly gunfight with pakistani forces took place on tuesday. two indian soldiers were killed, one injured. it says the remains of the dead soldiers were mutilated. pakistan denies the negotiation. they have resumed comprehensive talks, which include the delicate subject of kashmir to try to improve bilateral relationship. another gunfight killed one pakistani soldier and injured another. observers say such incidents threaten to harm relations between the two nuclear neighbors. >>> politics in pakistan is heading for a potentially game-changing moment. former sporting hero turned politics enran kahn is wins legions of fans with his fierce stance against u.s. military policy and with parliamentary elections due by may, there is everything to play for. nhk world reports. >> reporter: imuran khan is ri
to resolve the fiscial clif. uni nazir was killed in pakistan -- he is one of the leaders accused of sending fighters into afghanistan but was seen as a friend in the pakistani state. for more on the use of drones, we have -- from the south asian council. how important a figure was this man? >> it is a huge, symbolic act. he has been replaced by someone else. the key message is the u.s. will follow and take out people crossing the border. if he was a friend to pakistan or if they were allowing him to operate because he wasn't attacking pakistan is a different matter. but his people along with similar groups were on the fringes, harboring elements that continue to attack the pakistani state. >> we have seen criticism of the u.s. drone policy -- would you expect more of that? a> in recent months there is heightened cooperation and visits from the head of inter- services and i believe they may well have understanding on the type of targeting that is permissable if the u.s. helps pakistan with the pakistani taliban, then perhaps the u.s. can get away with its own targeting list. >> this strike r
to the important issues regarding pakistan, with respect to the important issues regarding the region. we called the event "back to the future." some people have spoken before about this, and what we mean by that. i think we will let that emerged as the discussion goes on. we know we have a lot of fundamental issues to talk about. certainly, military presence has been an issue talked about in the newspapers all lot. governance is an important issue. technical issues, such as what type of agreements might be signed between the u.s. and afghanistan, are important. the role of pakistan. many others. with that, let me turn to our three speakers, each of whom will speak for six to 10 minutes, roughly speaking. then we'll open it up to dialogue, with the audience. i will give you the floor. >> my responsibilities for afghanistan go back to 2001. it is fair to say i was present at the creation of at least the current regime in kabul. i started by looking back and trying to spot the things we did wrong. it strikes me that there were three fundamental errors, two of which are perceived at the time and tr
in northwest pakistan. his violent movies are box office gold. we hear from quentin tar antino about his new fimlm abnd nd signature style. welcome to our viewers on public television and around the globe. the five men accused of raping a university student for hours on a bus were charged and if convicted they may face the death penalty. the 23 year old woman died last week. it has sparked a debate in india. >> protests go on on the rape that has shocked india. lawyers set up to handle the case get their first trial. none are prepared to defend the five men charged with murdering and raping the student. >> it is heinous and in respect to the girl victim and sas a message that we want to send to society, we want our society to be safe and such criminals will not get representation. >> no one is at home at the shack where the bus driver was living. the juvenile suspect al ledgedly caused the worst violence. the neighborhood under a cloud of shame. they say attitudes to women need to change. >> the problem siis with men, says this woman. and their bad intentions. after boarding the bus, the med
. >> pakistan in turmoil as the supreme court orders the prime minister's rest -- are rest. >> france's mali mission. >> and has disgraced cyclist lance armstrong finally owned up to cheating? we begin in pakistan where the supreme court has ordered the arrest of the prime minister and 16 others over corruption charges. >> this came after a mass protest in the capital added to pressure by the government. >> and aid to the government has accused the military of orchestrating the protests, and the order to arrest the prime minister. this political turmoil comes just months ahead of national elections. >> instead of millions, security officials say it is more like 25,000 protesters gathered in the parliaments in islamabad. there have been isolated clashes, and there was violence as demonstrators reached the heavily fortified area around the parliament building. gunshots were heard, but it was unclear if they were from protesters or police. he is so far unknown in pakistani politics and is demanding the government step down immediately and that a caretaker government be set up to ensure that ele
and significantly discordant situation in both afghanistan and across the border in pakistan. so i think you probably are going to see an unraveling gradually. i think there's only one afghan brigade that is capable of acting independently. these forces need air support intelligence, all of the kind of logistics and other support that is necessary to be effective. fighting forces, they're not going to have that, and so i am much less an optimist about this eventual outcome. but when you look at the middle east, look at what happened at iraq, look at what happened in syria, the united states no longer leading from behind waiting from behind, and then you look at the decisions concerning afghanistan, you can understand why people throughout the region believe the united states is withdrawing and that is not good for the region. >> schieffer: let me ask you this senator. we went to afghanistan in the beginning because we wanted them to deny al-qaeda a safe haven the terrorists who caused 9/11 and i think to some extent we probably have done that. but as long as they have a safe haven in pakist
. at least 15 wounded. the taliban is claiming responsibility. across the border in pakistan combat firefighters killed in drone strikes. u.s. drones targeted three militant hideouts. no word on the identity of those killed but we are told two pont commanders including the head of the training unit for suicide bombers may be among them. also in pakistan four people killed in an attack on a train. top story as we go around the world in 80 seconds. in 80 seco pakistan, that attack happening on a passenger train in the southwestern part of the country. the dead include three passengers and a member of pakistan's military. a dozen more people were injured. so far no one is claiming responsibility for the attack. >> india, an inferno burning at a fuel storage terminal in the west. (siren sounding) it started yesterday in one tank and spread overnight to other tanks because of strong winds. the fire so big, smoke and flames can be seen from nearly ten miles away. officials say several people who work at the facility are missing. china, dense fog being blamed for a 30-car pileup, the massi
on a plan to exempt the drone attacks in pakistan from a list of operations that would be covered under newly enacted rules. areas covered in the so-called play book include the process for adding names to kill lists, the principles for killing u.s. citizens abroad, and the command chain for authorizing cia or u.s. military strikes outside war zones. the exemption of drone strikes in pakistan would allow the cia to continue carrying them without -- tearing them without a legal framework for a to two years. the hostage standoff in a jury of his ended in the deaths of dozens of people, including up to 48 of the captured workers. algerian forces say they recovered at least 25 bodies after storming the militant held gas complex saturday, bringing the confirmed death toll to least 80. witnesses say the hostages were brutally executed. the toll could have been worse as hundreds of hostages had earlier managed to escape. a will on islamist fighter has claimed responsibility for the attack on behalf of the al qaeda. the militants who took the complex claimed there were doing so to seek an end t
is among eight people killed by a u.s. drone strike in pakistan. as you probably know the obama administration has stepped up the use of drones overseas to target suspected terrorists. president obama's nomination of john brennan to be the next cia director suggests that trend is likely to continue. brennan, a strong proponent of drones as the president's chief counterterrorism advisor. for more on how the u.s. drone program works let's get to chief washington correspondent james rosen. he is live for us at the state department. james? >> reporter: jon, good morning. this program presents a consistent headache for the diplomats in this building and who must frequently contend with complaints from afghan and pakistani officials who say these drones all too often wind up killing innocent civilians instead of terrorists the drone program is one of the national security initiatives that president obama inherited from the bush administration and one which the current commander-in-chief has dramatically expanded. for all his criticism of president bush during the 2008 campaign over hi
on the disgrace, the fall of lance armstrong. >>> also following international stories. pakistan's government under fire on two fronts. first the supreme court ordered the arrest of the country's prime minister, number of officials over corruption allegations. the second, you've got protesters they have filled streets of the capital in islamabad. they are on the main boulevard leading up to the president's residence, the national assembly and the supreme court led by a muslim cleric, thousands of people are calling for pakistan's leaders to be thrown out in favor of a caretaker government. i want to bring in and get more from sima. if you could, explain to us why the unrest in pakistan now? why do they want the prime minister to step down? >> reporter: well, suzanne, this is an embattled government right now, seemingly out of nowhere the protests erupted the muslim cleric from canada returned to pakistan calling for a million man march and on the same day the supreme court, which had been looking into allegations of kickbacks regarding two years ago in 2011 now has ordered the government forc
, pakistan, and sudan. historians will judged his senate years on his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many people recognized ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, he has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or governments, but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said it is the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he has been working quietly to help a father from massachusetts, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to egypt. john even called former president mubarak and had a screaming match with him about it. five times he has been to egypt and every time, colin has been at the top of his list in every meeting. every senator has a colin -- it is what we do. we fight for people back home. as secretary, john will understand that and bend over backwards to help us do that. he will be a terrific bridge from the hill to the administration. i know that john kerry cares deeply about our country and our national security. i know he believes in
leader was among 13 killed in two u.s. drone strikes in pakistan jenna: right now a murder trial is going on in arizona for a woman who admitted, admitted to murdering her boyfriend. now she has changed her story a few times. first, she insisted she didn't do it. she would never do something like that. then she said she did kill him, and it was self-defense. rick folbaum has latest on this story, rick? >> you get a sense where this trial is going to go hearing the defense attorney's opening argument. she told the jury flat-out that jodi arias killed her former boyfriend but says arias was forced to kill him and the defense's case will explain why. travis alexander was found dead back in 2008, five days after jodi arias shot him in the face, stabbed him 27 times and slit his throat. she certainly left nothing to chance but her lawyer says she only did it because alexander was an abusive sexual deviant. >> had joe di not been forced to defend herself, none of us would be here. in that one minute had jodi not chosen to defend herself, she would not be here. >> reporter: the prosecutor saying
, a different kind of mission? those who are in the pakistan, particularly the safe havens that are in pakistan, what kind of police will you have? thank you. >> the mission will be fundamentally different. just to repeat, our main reason should we have troops in afghanistan post 2014 at the invitation of the afghan government, will be to make sure that we are training, assisting and advising afghan security forces, who have now taken the lead for and are responsible for security throughout afghanistan, and an interest that the united states has, the very reason we went to afghanistan in the first place, and that is to make sure that al qaeda and its affiliates cannot launch an attack against the united states or other countries from afghan soil. we believe that we can achieve that mission in a way that is very different from the very active presence that we have had in afghanistan over the last 11 years. president karzai emphasized the strains that u.s. troop presences in afghan villages, for example, have created. well, that's not going to be a strain that exists if there is a follow-up opera
. there is even talk he might be held in south pakistan or paris. do you know why she thought that? >> the e-mail came from pakistan. that is why we started looking at the possibility but i don't believe he is there. i believe he is still in iran. >> they spoke with secretary clinton about her husband and they said they will do everything they can to help him be home. he has been missing since 2007. >> before you leigh the hou-- ae the house let's get an update on the weather. >> there could be tornadoes in southeastern texas. it is part of the storm system that is producing a flooding concern across eastern texas, louisiana and arkansas because it has a lot of moisture with it and it will be dumping a lot of heavy rain and has been doing so since yesterday across the areas. the good side of the storm is we have an invow across texas and oklahoma and we are seeing much needed rain in some of these areas. stay alert with flooding in your area. we are seeing areas across the great lakes. we will see rain across portions of the northeast with the same storm system. new orleans over mississippi
that when we leave, the taliban and al qaeda will come back. as long as they're given safe haven in pakistan, they're just waiting for us to leave. i do not see any benefit for our country to remain there. host: some of the callers have said we need to keep at least 10,000. some of the stories we have been reading have said anywhere from 3000-6000. you say we should be out of their completely? caller: yes, i think we should just leave. as long as they have one of the most corrupt governments of their -- as long as pakistan allows the taliban and al qaeda safe havens, they are just waiting for us to leave and they will come back in. host: we are going to move on to paul in illinois. paul served as an officer. what kind of work did you do over there? caller: i was army and i work in civil affairs during reconstruction in the 2010 and 2011. host: what kind of response did you get for the reconstructive work you were doing? caller: it was mixed with the afghan people. in areas interested in the work for reconstruction with medical and education. education is the key to success. one said we have
, climbing support for the state department. you have pakistan and afghanistan, with the drawal from afghanistan that will only make it harder, and that has impact on pakistan. china, and russia. leadership in russia, as you know, very, very complicated. where does he look first for support, and, you know, who wants this job? >> i would say the middle east -- the hard thing that you hit on is the challenges for a secretary of state and for the united states generally in foreign policy have not waned. they have probably increased. in libya and benghazi and secretary clinton tried to make this point and senator kerry as well that the funding for all of these things is -- it's a fine it amount of money, and it's shrinking at the moment. the difficulty of a world that remains kredably complex, probably more complex, with our somewhat increasingly limited ability to sort of address every hotspot that we like, it's a very, very difficult challenge for any secretary of state. john kerry or anyone else. we saw it with hillary clinton. yes, she had successes clearly, but she also centeringled
in pakistan. mullah nazir was known for plotting attacks against coalition troops. his death is considered a major blow to the taliban. but it could jeopardize u.s. relations with pakistan, as well because nazir, reportedly, had a truce with that country's military. >>> and the family of a missing journalist from new hampshire now confirms that he has been kidnapped in syria. james foley and another journalist, who has not been identified, haven't been heard from since november 22nd, underscoring the risk. the u.n. now estimates that more than 60,000 people have died in syria's civil war. >>> meanwhile, back in this country, a medical helicopter has crashed in iowa overnight, killing a pilot and two nurses flying from a hospital in mason city, to pick up a patient. there's no word yet on what may have caused the crash. we'll have updates as news becomes available. >>> in las vegas, two people were able to escape the fiery plane crash you see here. the twin-engine plane actually skidded off the runway and burst into flames. but both people onboard managed to crawl out before the fire engulf
policy board and has served as a senior adviser as recently as 2011 for afghanistan and pakistan to the late richard holbrooke, former munk debater. ladies and gentlemen, dean vali nasser. [applause] when you think of provocative conversation on a big foreign policy challenges of the day, you have to think about our next debater. his flagship global affairs overam on cnn is seen in 200 countries worldwide but he is anything but a talking head on cable tv. he rights a highly respected column for "the washington post" and is the editor-at-large of "time" magazine. his numerous best selling books include "the post-american world" and "the future of freedom." please welcome back to the munk debate stage, broadcaster and journalist, fareed zukaria. we are just moments from getting our debate underway but before we hear from opening statements, once again, i'm going to need this audience's assistance as the night goes on to make sure our debaters stay on time in terms of their opening and closing remarks and that we move forward as a debate together so you will see this countdown clock
three questions. one is afghanistan, the sec is pakistan. with regard to afghanistan, i wanted to ask you about the first question relates to president karzai and the leches ahead of them. when he was here just a couple of weeks ago, i had the chance to visit with him in leader mcconnel's office and a number of senators as well. and to ask him directly about the elections and ask him about my second question. but i wanted to get your sense of where you see those lexes going. what efforts you can undertake to make sure that they are free and fair because they've been, i think, central to the next chapter in this transition. i just wanted to comment on that. the second question as it relates to afghanistan is one that senator boxer raised and her work on this has been exemplary, on women and girls and in particular, i have a -- an amendment that we got through the national defense authorization act which would require both state and defense to file a report on the efforts to promote the security of afghan women and girls just by way of itemization monitoring and responding to changes in
, afghanistan, and pakistan. every other country in the world, we are under the kind of contracting rules that i think do interfere with our capacity to get the best deal, particularly when it comes to security that we should in these countries where the threats unfortunately are going to always be with us. >> should we look to extend that to mali and the drc and somalia? >> i would recommend -- there was an article in one of the newspapers that went into detail and here's how it started. for more than two decades, they required the state department to select the cheapest rather than the best contractors for the embassies abroad. you get what you pay for. the provision started in 1990 and stayed with us. i would respectfully request that this submitee take a look at it. you can't do a total lifting of it for everybody, at least look at the high threat posts where we did it for iraq, afghanistan and pack o pakistan and the countries you are naming are countries that i would fall into that category. >> thank you very much. among the various extremist groups operating in africa today, in your view,
suddenly without warning. the drone strike which killed several militants in pakistan's rugged tribal area is causing new controversy. jill dougherty has details for us. what's going on some. >> wolf, u.s. official now is confirming the death of that key warlord. he is not saying how he died but he does say that he and his men were directly responsible for planning and carrying out cross border attacks on coalition forces in afghanistan as well as providing protection for al qaeda forces in pakistan. pakistani intelligence officials tell cnn what they believe was a u.s. drone has killed a key pakistani taliban commander in south waziristan. pakistani warlord who sent his men to afghanistan to fight u.s. and nato troops. the pentagon is not confirming his death but senior officials are calling reports that he died a major development. nazeer, they say, had a lot of blood on his hands. george little, pemt gone spokesman said, any time a bad guy has a bad day, it's a good day for us. but in pakistan, fury over the killing. a man who played both sides. >> he was one of the top commanders of th
died in that strike. it happened in pakistan's volatile tribal region in the province of south wazirstan. pakistani officials say the men were among 15 killed today in drone attacks. u.s. officials insists the use of unmanned aircraft with missiles is successful on to fight terrorist elements, but human rights groups says the number of civilians killed is too high. peter bergen joins us from washington. tell us about how the obama administration has relied on these drone strikes and what they've been able to accomplish. >> well, they've killed 37 leaders of al qaeda and the taliban, but they've also in the process killed hundreds of others. there's a controversy about how many civilians. i work at a foundation called the new america foundation where we track it carefully. we calculate there were five civilian deaths in 2012. that's not dissimilar to the accounts of other organizations that count these things. the civilian death toll has dropped remarkably in the last several years. in the 2004-2007 time frame it was about 60%. the reason is better intelligence, drones that fly
against terrorism. tens of thousands of people in pakistan are protesting in the streets, furious at corruption in their own government. and just this morning, pakistan's highest court ordered the prime minister to be placed under arrest. this is a move critics claim is unconstitutional. security forces, meanwhile, are standing on shipping containers to block access to parliament. they're firing guns and tear gas to hold back the crowds. we'll have updates as news warrants. >>> and now, to your money and a price spike at the supermarket. the cold snap bringing record low temps to the southwest is starting to drive up prices in the produce aisle. people across the country are already paying more for lettuce. prices, meanwhile, for broccoli and cauliflower are likely to rise, as well. farmers from california to arizona say the unusually frigid weather has damaged their crops. and it could take ten days to determine the full impact. >>> and a troubling sign for the economy and the financial security for millions of americans. a new report showing that more than one-quarter of america
of 2012, this includes the george bush ground and barack obama and pakistan alone killed between 2500, and 3300 people, between 475, and 884 were civilians and 176 were children. these are obviously innocent children. we know two of these children were americans. we also know the president never asked congress to declare war on the government or the state in the area where these drones hogan and we know his new secretary of defense is in favor of fewer troops on the ground and his new head of the cia like this drone program. we have a president who has not hesitated to kill foreign innocent children or american innocent children when they are in a foreign country. he loses great credibility when he stands with innocent american children and says i am going to keep you safe. charles: what do you think? >> i don't think the president's intentions were to kill children. stuart: charles: we know that is not his intention but if you got out this haphazardly and drop bombs indiscriminately out of a sky that is what happens. you hear some guy in a cafe and a crowded city so are other people
country elsewhere. >> right. although, when that didn't matter in pakistan, when they went after osama bin laden. the united states seems to go in when they want to go in. >> you know, in a situation like pakistan, where they took unilateral action, they were afraid, obviously, that the grade would have been compromised, had they let the local government know. this is a different situation now, and we've been working closely with the algerians, and i don't expect that this would be a unilateral type of situation. but as my colleague was saying, i know the offers are on the table, that, you know, any resources that can be brought to bear, to help the algerians resolve this thing are going to be readily available. >> all right. >> and this is a situation, quite frankly, that we might have been able to see coming. the person that was actually bearing responsibility for this, mokhtar belmokhtar actually made a video about a month ago saying, attacks are coming, expect it. so in essence, we should have been circling the wagons, expecting something like this to happen. >> all right. well, don an
. iraq, afghanistan and pakistan so every country in the world we are under the kind of contracting world that i think do interfere with our capacity to get the best deal, particularly when it comes to security that we should in these countries where the threats unfortunately are going to always be with us. >> should we look to extend that to the drc come to somalia? >> there was an article i think in one of the newspapers today that went into some detail. basically years has started. federal law required the state department to select the cheapest rather than the best contractor to provide local card services at its embassies abroad and there's that old saying you get what you pay for and this lowest price provision started off in 1990, but it has just stayed with us and i would respectfully request that this committee would take a hard look at it. you can't do a total lifting of it for everybody at least look at the highest post where obviously we did it for iraq and afghanistan and pakistan and the countries that you are naming our countries that i think would fall into that category.
on that deadly attack on aid workers in pakistan. we'll learn how a failed plan to capture osama bin laden may have led to a violent climate against innocent civilians who were only trying to help others. >>> and a new movie touching nerves and sparking controversy. we'll hear from the stars of "django unchained." a fascinating interview. >> i have not seen it yet. i hear jamie foxx is pretty good. but tarantino does not shy away from controversy. >>> children, teachers and staff take up a familiar scene this morning, they are going to school. >> parents are being reassured that the new setng is the safest school in the entire country. abc's diana perez has more on this. good morning, diana. >> reporter: rob and paula, it's been less than three weeks since the mac kerr at sandy hook elementary school in newtown, connecticut. it will be a long time before things return to normal for the children of sandy hook elementary. but in an effort to bring them one step closer, they saw their teachers again wednesday and walked through what will be their new school. >> children are coming up, so excited
' education in her native pakistan. it is remarkable, though, and very heartwarming, isn't it, to see these images of malala, the 15-year-old girl, walking away almost unaided, holding the hand of a nurse, in the hospital. she even had the strength to wave to the staff that has been looking after her over the course of the past three months or so since she was evacuated from pakistan with the terrible head injuries. she's going to be located at her temporary home. her family have moved over from pakistan to birmingham in central england near to the hospital. she's going to be going back with her father and mother and two younger brothers. the doctors at the hospital say that will be best for her, but she'll still come back and forth from the hospital to get clinical treatment and she'll also have to be re-admitted according to the hospital as well for cranial reconstruction surgery. her skull was obviously smashed by the bullet that was fired into her head by the taliban gunmen back in october and she still has to undergo a lot of surgery to, you know, kind of make that damage good, s
was shot pakistan last october. the taliban targeted her because of stopping young girls from getting education . we wish her all of the best. and there is a movement brewing in texas to get the state to secede from the u.s.. there is it a petition on the white house website that received 124,000 signatures since president obama's reelection. has the fiscal cliff helped thrertheir cause. joining us is it the texas national move the group pushing for secession. tell us why it is it time for texas to secede from the union? >> well, uma, there is it a lot of reasons that we believe that texas should leave the union. but basically it boils down to political freedom that we have loss. cultural freedom and certainly the economy that you have been talking about on your show for the last 45 minutes. there is it 16 trillion rein it is right there and with the negotiations that went on last weekend, we add 4. something trilion. we have 20 trillion reasons to try to protect the economy and people of texas from what we believe is it a certain coming disaster. >> and you folks are leading a seriou
from neighboring pakistan. president obama said he will announce exactly what he plans to do in the coming months. brian. >> white house correspondent kristen welker from the north lawn on a friday night. kristen, thanks. one more note from that meeting at the white house today. president obama announced the newest recipient of the medal of honor, this nation's highest military decoration for valor. it will be awarded next month to now-retired army staff sergeant clinton romesha from north dakota for his courageous actions while serving as a section leader back in '09. he will be the fourth living recipient awarded the medal of honor for actions in either iraq or afghanistan. >>> now to the skies. it's been a rough week for boeing its new state-of-the-art 787 dreamliner, ending today with federal officials announcing a top to bottom review of the aircraft. this after a series of what appear to be unrelated incidents that have embarrassed the company and raised concerns about safety along the way. tom costello covers aviation for us. he's with us from dulles airport outside wa
. the terribly difficult challenge dealing with and reducing the flow of calcium ammonium nitrate from pakistan into afghanistan which finds its way into the roadside bombs that kill our troops, known as ied's. thank you for the work. the work on behalf of women throughout the world but also women and girls particularly in afghanistan and even though we are still in the throes of responding to the challenges in syria, the great work you have done on humanitarian assistance and other elements of that strategy we have worked together on. i also want to commend the words he spoke today about not retreating when it comes to getting that balance right queen engagement and also security. both high priorities. i was struck by and i am glad you were so is this a bit on page 3 of your testimony about -- you were so pacific on page 3 of your testimony. the recommendation by the board which now has found its way into the jake now is a set of 64 specific action items. you said 85% are on track to be completed by the end of march. what if any impediments and implementation do you perceive right now and are
down drone attacks on al qaeda affiliates in pakistan, yemen, will not use other counterterrorism resources to identify, locate and detain the terrorists involved in the death of our ambassador and others in libya. this inconsistent policy may stem from the president's hasty campaign promise to shut down guantanamo bay, gitmo, prematurely transfer detention facilities in iraq and afghanistan. in doing so the president effectively ended america's ability to detain and interrogate terrorists, depriving the f.b.i., the c.i.a. and other agencies of critical opportunities to obtain information on al qaeda networks. today, as the case of benghazi suspect harzi, has demonstrated, the united states is completely reliant on the cooperation of host countries to detain on our behalf and selectively allow access to suspects. as in the case of harzi, as demonstrated, this approach is fraught with diplomatic roadblocks, costing critical time and getting information from suspects to track terrorist networks. perhaps that is why president obama so often opts to use lethal drone strikes to kill te
and japan? i'm not sure about the muslim brotherhood aid but on pakistan that's been a big issue, both republicans and depps have said, we need to pare back that aid to pakistan. senator rand paul has been pushing that. others like senator john mccain say, we can't just cut them off. foreign aid is very important if we want to get them to do what we want them to do and foster democracy. host: before we let you go here, we're going to take another phone cull, but tell us the fresh minnesota class, some names and faces people should be looking out for, people who might make a name for themselves in the 113th? guest: one is senator tim kaine, he beat george allen in the election, a former governor, he's close to president obama. he was almost picked as vice president. obama and kain talked about him running in the senate, then he ended up winning. that's a democrat to watch. you have to watch the democrats in the senate. elizabeth warren won a huge battle with senator scott broun. -- scott brown. how is she going to operate? the financial industry is a little nervous about elizabeth warre
and more drone togs the sky. the united states has committed 340 drone strikes in pakistan with eight of those coming in the last 30 days n. yemen and somalia, there have been 55 drone strikes and seven of those in the last 30 days. the president's use of drones raises questions and criticiss s and inspired nyu jerome headley to gather new data. 25 specific drone strikes will be investigated, and an action praised by the proponents of the program.y spencer, you have written a ton on this, and what should we be thinking of the new technology for waging war? >> more about the platform and less about the strategy that it implements and to some degree accelerates, and what i mean by that is that the drone, itself, is not qualitatively a transformational thing in warfare. we are basically talking about aerial bombardment and using a smaller weapon to do it, and that size is just going to shrink, so you have less power applied to a particular target, but when you look at the thing and how it is applied, it is not so much different if the pilot is thousands of miles away rather nan in the co
we see in pakistan and other places. also in north africa and yemen sometimes when they fire the missiles and take out targets from the air. these are going to be just for surveillance, out there gathering intelligence. the thing you are talking about in this neighborhood is it is hard to have human intelligence. the cia has a network of people that give them information. in this part of the world, in this neighborhood, they don't. they have little intel. the drones will be up there looking for movements of groups they are worried about. >> do we think there is significant numbers of al qaeda in niger? >> in the neighborhood. this is the concern in mali. what happened in the north when the al qaeda linked groups, the islamists came over to take over what was a separatist regime at the time and hijacked it, you have groups spread across this area that encompasses many countries. you can see they are starting to work together. that worries a lot of people. >> i don't know if you can answer this question. how much does this pose a direct threat to us here in the united states wh
, endangering the government of pakistan and risking the prospect that pakistan is very substantial arsenal of nuclear weapons would fall into radical hands. that's why we're there and if we lose sight of that and i think that's what the administration is doing, we'll find ourselves sooner, rather than later, under real threats once again. bill: that is a significant issue. something we'll watch especially tomorrow. thank you, sir. >> thank you. bill: john bolton in washington. martha of the. martha: this is a huge story right now. we have a deadly flu outbreak that is really causing havoc and so much illness in this country. one city has declared a public health emergency on this. so there's a lot you need to know. that's coming up. bill: also a mother saving her family from an intruder with her own gun. police just releasing the 911 calls of a terrifying home invasion. listen here. >> i heard a lot of screaming. >> right. i'm sure she's upset. >> no. she was shooting. as a mom, you spend a lot of time helping others. hamburger helper can help you back. and with box tops for education on e
with extraordinary care because some of the opposition that we get in parts of pakistan and other parts of the world come from a perception of american arrogance in the use of things like drones. so it's got to be a very mature balanced approach. stuart: would it be true to say that we're withdrawing boots on the ground to fight al qaeda and using high in the sky look down shoot em stuff? >> well, you won't win a war that way because it can only be part of a strategy, and president obama has made that clear. but in a place like afghanistan or even pakistan, what you are really counting on is the host nation forces standing up and doing their part to control areas of the ground on the population. and then in combination, they can be very effective. stuart: general, i want to talk about your book because i have actually read much of it. my share of the task. it is a good book. very easy read. to me it was almost like a thriller. it was great stuff. i have a question for you, you are obviously a very talented man, in the military, brilliant organizer, how are you going to put those talents to work in t
pakistan. they don't trust hamid karzai coming here. you remarked in the book you think he was elected but to a lot of the folks, they just don't trust him. >> it's very difficult. president karzai is the elected landlord of the country. we can't view our partner nations that we can call the shots. that is not what we want with the partner. we want a sovereign nation that can be strong. think we need to look at it that way. that the effort that our current policy is trying to implement. >> neil: do you think this president even wants to be in this region? he was critical about the bellicose nature of the bush years and he wanted to reverse that. he was stuck with it coming in and he couldn't get request quicker leaving? >> i think all americans, when they look at the region now, it's where the thrift 9/11 emanated from. we've had a difficult decade. >> neil: what would you have done after 9/11? >> it's interesting, i thought a lot about this. i would have acted a little differently but only with hindsight. first thing i would have done is 10,000 young americans to language school. i wo
mission or return to pakistan? joining us now is the president of act for america, and the author bridgette gabriel. >> good morning, just to recap, let's tell malala's story again. she has been a champion for years of girls education in pakistan. she wants equal rights. she had a blog she spoke out about what was like being a young girl in the swat valley in pakistan, for all of that targeted tore the for the taliban and pulled over her school bus as she was on the way home from school and shot her in the head. miraculously, she survived, thanks to the great work of some pakistan and british doctors. she's now out of the hospital. what's the update on malala and what's next for her? >> she is out of the hospital and her father got a job in britain so her family will remain in britain, where she will be a little bit safer. they will have a little bit of security. but her life, it's going to be an uphill battle trying to protect ser he have from now on because she has become a symbol of freedom to many women in the islamic world and this is why she is he' going to remain a target a
operating with the support of the is side or the acquiescence of the isi and pakistan. we have huge, huge challenges that the administration has to deal with, and that of the debt of up to it. >> they are certainly up there. call it whatever you want. their ability did carry a bigger tax to fund a tax has been degraded. lou: i think last -- less characterized as remnants then a diffuse, disparate, and not always organized group of elements. >> that can be more dangerous. >> look at mali now. they're beating the french army. lou: the hostage-taking in algeria, seeking leverage because of that conflict. we thank you all for being here. appreciated. that's it for us tonight. we appreciate you being with us. be with us tomorrow when it gets even better. good night from new york. ♪ with the spark cash card from capital one, olaf gets great rewards for his small business! pizza! [ rth ] olaf's small busins earns 2% cash back on every purchase, ery day! helium delivery. put it on my spark card! [ pop! ] [ garth ] why settle for less? great businesses deserve great rewards! awesome!!! [ male an
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